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Odessa

Odessa has always been adored by artists, sculptors, writers and poets. It seems like inspiration dwells in every nook and cranny of the city, so it’s no wonder that here you can be impressed by one of the world’s most beautiful opera houses, diverse museums and galleries, peaceful gardens and amazing architecture. You can immerse yourself in one of the many musical, dance and literary and other cultural events hosted by the city. It’s an impressive performance for any master of arts.

The more sun – the more energy in your life. The more impressive the surroundings – the easier it is to learn. Do you have a goal, do you have a dream? Why not achieve them with pleasure! Come to Odessa to study Russian or Ukrainian languages, or learn the arts of cooking, painting, music and dance or develop you skills in sport (especially diving and yachting). If you do, you will discover that Odessa amply rewards those who strive for excellence.

Odessa is one of Ukraine’s most dynamic business travel destinations offering an increasingly wide choice of alternatives for business travelers in terms of accommodation and conference facilities. Today the city can offer more than 8800 beds in 160 hotels. Odessa has a well-developed infrastructure for various types of events (fairs, congresses, music and sport performances).

Once you come ashore, it is time to start exploring this energetic and cosmopolitan city, rich in history, culture and arts. After spending a few days in Odessa city and region you can continue cruising on the Black Sea. Odessa is the best departure point to go on a ferry or boat trip to Varna, Istanbul, Batumi and other major Black Sea ports.

Area237 sq.km
Population1,016,515
Founded1794

Key Figures

Location: Odessa is situated (46°28′N 30°44′E) on terraced hills overlooking a small harbor on the Black Sea in the Gulf of Odessa, approximately 31 km (19 mi) north of the estuary of the Dniester river and some 443 km (275 mi) south of the Ukrainian capital Kyiv.

Climate: humid subtropical climate or hot-summer humid continental climate

Status: center of Odeska Oblast

Public transport: buses and minibuses, trolleybuses, trams, taxi, sea motor ships, cable car, funicular

Notable people

– Ze’ev Jabotinsky, one of the Zionism founders
– Simon Wiesenthal, Nazi hunter
– Illya Mechnikov, Nobel Prize in Medicine 1908
– Igor Tamm, Nobel Prize in Physics 1958
– Selman Waksman, Nobel Prize in Medicine 1952
– Dmitri Mendeleev, world famous chemist
– Nikolay Pirogov, world famous doctor
– Ivan Sechenov, world famous biologist
– Oksana Baiul, Olympic champion in figure skating in 1994
– Ihor Belanov, European Footballer of the Year in 1986
– Charles Goldenberg, NFL football player
– Viacheslav Kravtsov, NBA basketball player
– Frank Cass, the founder of Frank Cass & Co. was a noted publisher in United Kingdom

Travel Information

One of Ukraine’s most scenic spots, Odessa is known for its rich history, cultural activities, architecture, beaches, cuisine and entertainment industry. It is also Ukraine’s largest port and therefore a trade, logistics and business hub.

According to aviation publication Anna.Aero, Odessa is leading Ukraine’s air traffic recovery since a nationwide low in 2014. Indeed, Odessa’s air traffic increased the most, by 32.5%, compared to a meagre average of 3.8% across most Ukrainian airports.

Odessa’s tourism industry has exponentially grown since 2000. Compared to 250,000 in 2003, Odessa received 1.2 million tourists in 2015 and 1.8 million tourists in 2016 mainly from Ukraine, Moldova, Belarus and Turkey.

As the World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC) reports, Ukraine’s tourism industry is expected to increase by 6.5% annually over the next 10 years, compared with 3.7% for Europe as a whole.

Kinds of tourism: sightseeing, historical, architectural, national (Greek, Jewish), V.I.P., event, incentive, Honeymoon, congress, extreme, medical, sport, property investment, beach, wine and brandy tasting

Video

Main Attractions & Sights

Deribasivska Street

Deribasovskaya is a symbol of Odessa, the most populous and vibrant street in a city. Today it is not even a street, but we can say an avenue, who likes to walk all citizens and their guests, because the traffic there is closed. The roadway was faced with masonry – paving blocks. Next to Deribasovskaya there is Odessa`s City Garden, together they create a great walking boulevard with restaurants, cafes and shops. This is a historic part of the city, because the Street is full of the old buildings of the architecture of 19th century.

Opera House

Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninoff conducted on its stage, the great Enrico Caruso, and Feodor Chaliapin sang, and Pavlova and Isidora Duncan danced. The popular magazine “Forbes” included the Odessa Opera House into a list of the most important sights in Eastern Europe. Odessa Opera House was the first in Ukraine at its time of construction, in meaning and popularity. The first theater was opened in 1810, but in 1873 it was completely destroyed by fire. The city invited Viennese architects, F. Felner and H. Helmer, to draft a new building. It took nearly fifteen years for Odessa to rebuild the Opera House and it was opened on October 1st, 1887.

The Potemkin Stairs

The Potemkin Stairs (Potemkinskaya Lestnitsa) – one of Odessa’s trademarks – is rightfully acknowledged as one of the most beautiful staircases in Europe, and Odessa’s residents proudly call it the eighth wonder of the world. This monumental architectural installation, which connects the town center to the port, was created in 1841. Italian architect Francesco Boffo designed it at the request of Novorossiysky region’s governor-general, Prince Mikhail Vorontsov. This was his present to his beloved wife Elisabeth, and, at the same time, a favor to the elites, who lived in mansions on Primorsky Boulevard and dreamed of a convenient way to get to the sea. The stairs got their name and world fame thanks to the famous film director Sergey Eisenstein, who shot them in his movie “The Battleship Potemkin”, one of the most significant films in world cinema’s history. Today, the Potemkin Stairs are 142 meters (466 feet) long and have 192 stairs.

Laocoon

Laocoon In Greek mythology, Laocoon is the priest-prophet from Troy. Laocoon warned the Trojans of taking the gift from their enemies (“Trojan horse”) – and for that he was punished. The enraged goddess Athene sent monstrous snakes to kill the priest and his sons. The original sculpture was created by the Greeks in the Ist century BC, and now it is kept in the Vatican. While being in Italy, the governor of Odessa G. Marazli was very impressed by it and ordered a copy. In 1870 the Laocoon was established in a summer residence of Marazli, then the sculpture was transferred to the Preobrazhenskaya street, and only in 1971 it got to its present location. The Marble priest in Odessa several times got into complicated situations: in the 30s a naked Laocoon “was covered up” – they painted ink pants for him, and later his nakedness was covered with a fig leaf.

City Hall

Situated on the Primorskiy Boulevard the building which houses the City Hall nowadays is the place of the former old Stock Exchange in Odessa. Trading has always been the main source of Odessa budget income, so it is only natural that the Stock Exchange building occupied the foreground of the city and was further converted into the City Council and Mayor place.

Spaso-Preobrazhenskiy Cathedral

In 1795, just one year after the founding of Odessa, the Nickolayev church was built on Sobornaya square. The cathedral became one of the biggest in Russia. It was almost 50 meters wide and over 100 meters long. It could accommodated over 10,000 people and was the pride of Odessa. In 1932 it was closed down. The square was officially renamed Soviet Army square, but unlike the over 170 other street and park name changes, the newer name never stuck with Odessites. In 1936 Stalin order the Cathedral destroyed. In a cowardly manner the cathedral was dynamited in the night. The church has begun to be rebuilt since 1999.

Arcadia

largest and most developed beach in Odessa is Arcadia. It is situated just a 15 minute taxi ride from the city center. The main entrance is clearly labeled by two pillars with a sign that reads Arcadia. Behind the sign is a long, shaded boulevard which boasts dozens of entertainment options ranging from karaoke while on a horse to go cart riding. Along this path, you will also notice dozens of cafes, restaurants and kiosks. After about a 200 meter walk you will see a nightclub Ibiza which sits slights before the entrance to the beach. From here you can choose to either go downstairs onto the main Arcadia beach or take a left or a right and choose numerous surrounding stretches of sand that all fall within Arcadia’s premises. It is our personal recommendation to walk left until you see large water slides. Here is a full serviced part of Odessa’s Arcadia beach, which offers umbrellas and lying chairs for a fee. There is a bar on this part of the beach, soft music and waiter service. Changing rooms and showers are all included with the price. Other activities you can do on this beach range from Jet Skiing to relaxing massages from wondering masseuses.

Shah’s Palace

The building was erected in the English Gothic style by architect F.Gonsiorovskiy in 1852 for Polish noble Z.Brzozowski. This family had owned the palace until 1910 when another Polish noble bought it, Count Schenbeck. He rented it to Mohammad Ali Shah Qajar, the deposed Shah of Persia. In the USSR, the palace was a public building. It was not taken good care of, and after the collapse of the Soviet Union it became decrepit. It was rented to a bank and renovated. The exterior of the palace has not changed much. Unfortunately though, the interior has been nearly completely lost except for the entrance hall and the front stairs. Figuratively, the palace is a counterbalance to Vorontsov’s palace located on the opposite bank of the ravine. One can walk there on a pedestrian bridge.

Mother-in-Law Bridge

The bridge was built over Jeanne Labourbe Descent (Voennyy Descent both now and originally) in 1968 by architect A.Vladimirskaya and engineer Kiriyenko. They tried to finish it by the 50th anniversary of the Revolution but failed to do so. It is the longest, tallest and narrowest bridge in Odessa. Its formal name was Komsomolskiy but the bridge was never known by this name. Later it was reamed to Kapitanskiy. Yet nowadays very few people have heard of those names. The bridge has a feature. It is very tall and if you stand still you may feel it rocking especially when there is a strong wind. And if several people jump together in sync you cannot but feel the swing. Again, back to the bridge name: some people say that the bridge is as loose as a mother’s-in-law tongue. Young people like to put locks on the railings. It is a silly tradition imported from Europe, presumably from Czechia a couple of years ago, approximately in 2006. This custom symbolizes solid relationship that is locked (the key is supposed to be thrown into water). According to estimates, there are about 10,000 locks on the bridge. A lock weighs about a pound, so they make up a significant load.

Odessa Philharmonic Society

The building occupies the site of the former Odessa new Stock Exchange. Philharmonic Hall, a historic monument in Odessa, was opened in 1899. Designed by famous Odessa architect of Italian origin Mario Bernardazzi, the hall is a fine example of turn of the century architectural character of Odessa and of the Venetian Gothic style.

The Catacombs

The sandstone on which Odessa stands is riddled with about 1000 km (620 miles) of tunnels, known as the katakombi (catacombs). Quarried out for building in the 19th century, they have since been used by smugglers, revolutionaries and WWII partisans. In Nerubayske village on the north-western edge of Odessa, a network of tunnels that sheltered partisans in WWII has been turned into the Museum of Partisan Glory. This museum is very popular. It is located 7 miles off Odessa. Catacombs served as a cover for Odessa Partisans during World War II. You’ll walk in tunnels under the ground, where conditions of partisan camp are reconstructed. You’ll here the story about Odessa heroes. The excursion begins with a brief drive through the city and will take you past small Ukrainian villages, farms, beautiful orchards and vineyards. Admire the changing view or take photographs of the countryside, formerly known as the breadbasket of the Soviet Union.

Vorontsov’s Palace

Vorontsov’s Palace completes the architectural complex of Primorskiy Boulevard in the north. It was built either in 1824-1827 or, according to another source, in 1826-1828, as the residence of New Russia Governor Count (later Prince) Mihail Vorontsov by architect F.Boffo who created 50 other buildings in Odessa but was famous for this one at the first place. The palace was erected in the Empire style where the Turkish fortress had been. What’s interesting, the dungeons of the fortress are still there under the palace and accessible from it. During the Crimean War in 1854 English and French ships shelled Odessa. 200 cannon balls hit the palace, in particular. When Vorontsov had learned about the bombardment, he ordered to hide his books in the dungeons. The palace became a public building after the 1917 revolution. Since 1936 the palace has been used for kids activities such as singing, dancing, music, etc. The interior of the palace was more or less intact, unlike its counterpart on the other bank of the ravine.

Shustov Cognac Winery Museum

Henceforth, all roads of Southern Palmyra lead not only to well-known Deribasivska Street, but also to one more place – Shustov Cognac Winery Museum, located in the historic heart of Odessa. Being opened in December, 2013 museum turned to be a place where history, art and cognac live. The first thing, which takes breath away, is scale and significance of the museum. In the basement of 1,700 square meters, the atmosphere of century antiquity is skillfully faceted by modernity, is felt.

Strolling along the centenary cellars, guests get acquainted with the history of cognac origin, learn technological secrets of producing. Thus, in one of the museum’s hall there is an original exhibit – a copy of alembic distillery of well-known French company “Prulho” which is considered a trendsetter in the world of distillation equipment. Reconstructed model of pre-revolutionary horse-drawn tram used to run advertising Shustov cognac is no less exciting. However, the priceless of the museum is a bottle of cognac, produced in 1913. It’s considered a protagonist in the story of success of Nikolay Shustov. Owing to its award at the World Exhibition in Paris in 1900, the noble drink Shustov started bearing the proud name “Cognac” and not “Brandy”.

Tour ends with professional cognac tasting The rich aroma of cognac fills the tasting room where guests reveal the secrets of getting the true pleasure of drinking this noble drink .

Akkerman Fortress

Ukrainian Bilhorod-Dnistrovsky (1.5 h driving from Odessa), along with Rome and Athens, is among the ten most ancient towns of the world. But tourists are attracted to this place by well-known Bilhorod-Dnistrovska (Akkerman) fortress.

The Bilhorod-Dnistrovskyi fortress was founded on the ruins of the ancient town Tyr as an impregnable citadel. Though being in “venerable” age and participant of many historical events, the fortress has managed to survive through the centuries, and preserve its outstanding power and grandeur. Today it is considered the best preserved medieval fortification in Ukraine.

For two centuries, the outpost served as good defense for its owners. However, in XV century it surrendered to the Ottomans. The Turks renamed it Akkerman (which means “White Fortress”), and ruled the territory for over 300 years. Nowadays, the Akkerman Fortress has been declared as a cultural heritage reserve. In addition to an exciting excursion and a visit to the archaeological museum, you can shoot with an arbalest, personally “examine” every inch of the ancient military equipment exposed in the Garrison Court, wander along the underground labyrinths, take a look at the waters of the Dniester firth from the height of one of the 34 donjons, and just have a good time.